Short Term vs Long Term Solvency Ratio – Difference and Comparison

What is the Short-Term Solvency Ratio?

The short-term solvency ratio is a financial metric used to assess a company’s ability to pay its current obligations. It is determined by dividing the current assets by the current liabilities of the organization. A current obligation is a debt due within a year, whereas a current asset is an asset that is anticipated to be turned into cash or used up within a year. A high short-term solvency ratio indicates a company’s strong financial position.

It’s crucial to remember that a high short-term solvency ratio does not equate to a company’s financial soundness. It could also indicate that the company is not efficiently using its assets and generating enough cash to cover its expenses. To fully comprehend a company’s financial health, it is crucial to consider additional financial measures like the debt-to-equity ratio and the return on assets.

What is the Long-Term Solvency Ratio?                                                                              

The long-term solvency ratio is a financial metric that measures a company’s ability to meet its long-term financial obligations. It is calculated by dividing the company’s long-term debt by its equity. A high long-term solvency ratio indicates that the company relies heavily on borrowed money to finance its operations and may struggle to meet its long-term financial obligations.

Investors need to consider the long-term solvency ratio when evaluating a company’s financial health. Companies with high long-term solvency ratios may risk defaulting on their debt if they cannot generate sufficient profits to meet their financial obligations. In contrast, companies with low long-term solvency ratios are more financially stable and are less likely to default on their debt.

Difference Between Short-Term Solvency Ratio and Long-Term Solvency Ratio

  1. The short-term solvency ratio measures a company’s ability to pay off its short-term debts, whereas the long-term solvency ratio measures a company’s ability to pay off its long-term debts, such as bonds and long-term loans, over a while greater than one year.
  2. Ratios like the current ratio and the quick ratio are often used to compute the short-term solvency ratio, whereas the long-term solvency ratio is calculated using ratios such as the debt-to-equity ratio and the interest coverage ratio.
  3. If a company’s short-term solvency ratio is high, it has the cash on hand to pay off its short-term debts shortly, whereas a high long-term solvency ratio indicates that a company has a strong financial position and can meet its long-term financial obligations.
  4. Short-term solvency ratios are important for assessing a company’s financial health in the short term, whereas long-term solvency ratios are important for assessing a company’s financial health over a longer period.
  5. Short-term solvency ratios are more relevant for businesses with short-term debts, such as retailers and wholesalers, whereas long-term solvency ratios are more relevant for businesses with long-term debts, such as manufacturers and construction companies.

Comparison Between Short-Term Solvency Ratio and Long-Term Solvency Ratio

Parameters of ComparisonShort-Term Solvency RatioLong-Term Solvency Ratio
DefinitionTo Pay Off Short-Term DebtsTo Pay Off Long-Term Debts
Calculation Formula  Current Ratio and the Quick RatioDebt-to-Equity Ratio and the Interest Coverage Ratio
IndicationSufficient LiquidityPowerful Financial Position
ImportanceAssessment of Financial Health for Short-TermAssessment of Financial Health for Long-Term
RelevancyBusinesses with Short-Term DebtsBusinesses with Long-Term Debts

References

  1. https://www.upet.ro/annals/economics/pdf/annals-2009-part2.pdf#page=137