Because vs As – Difference and Comparison

What is ‘Because’?

The word ‘because’ is a conjunctive adverb that indicates a cause or reason. It often links two clauses: “I went to the store because I needed milk.” The word ‘because’ can also be used in a single clause to introduce the reason for an action. For example, “I went to the store because I was out of milk.” 

When used as a conjunction, ‘because’ is followed by a clause that explains why the action occurred in the first clause, for example, “I went to the general store because I needed milk.” This sentence can be further broken down into two separate clauses: “I went to the general store” and “I needed milk.” The word ‘because’ establishes the cause-and-effect relationship between the two clauses. 

The word ‘because’ can also be used in a single clause to introduce the reason for an action. For example, “I went to the store because I was out of milk.” In this instance, the word ‘because’ is followed by a phrase that explains why the action occurred.

 In addition to being used as a conjunction, ‘because’ can also be used as an adverb to indicate the reason for an action. For example, “I went to the store because I had to.” In this instance, the word ‘because’ is followed by a phrase that explains why the action occurred. 

The word ‘because’ is a versatile word that can indicate a cause or reason for an action or link two clauses together.

What is ‘As’?

‘As’ is a word that has several uses in the English language. It can be used as a preposition, adverb, conjunction, or pronoun.  

When used as a conjunction, it introduces clauses that provide reasons or results. For example, “I opened the door, as she asked.” In this example, the clause introduced by “as” explains why the speaker opened the door.  

When used as a preposition, it introduces a comparison or refers to a situation in which two things are happening simultaneously or similarly. For example, “He ran as fast as he could.” In this example, the speaker compares one action (running) to another (as fast as possible). 

 When used as an adverb, it is used to indicate how someone feels or acts. For example, “He acted as if nothing had happened.” In this example, the speaker indicates how the person acted in a particular situation.  

When used as a pronoun, it refers to a person or thing previously mentioned. For example, “The dog barked, as it had done before.” In this example, the pronoun “it” refers to the dog. Overall, “As” is an adaptable word that can express different ideas in many ways.

Difference Between ‘Because’ and ‘As’

  1. ‘Because’ expresses a logical relationship, while ‘As’ expresses a temporal or spatial relationship.
  2. ‘Because’ can be used with two clauses, while ‘As’ cannot be used with two clauses.
  3. ‘Because’ is used in formal writing, while ‘As’ is used in formal and informal writing.
  4. ‘Because’ gives a reason, while ‘As’ gives an example.
  5. ‘Because’ expresses a cause-and-effect relationship, while ‘As’ expresses an analogy.

Comparison Between ‘Because’ and ‘As.’

Parameters of ComparisonBecauseAs
Meaning‘Because’ is used to explain the reason for something.‘As’ is used to compare two things.
Conjunction‘Because’ is a subordinating conjunction.‘As’ is a coordinating conjunction.
Usage as linking word‘Because’ is a linking word that connects two clauses.‘As’ is a linking word that connects two phrases.
Followed by‘Because’ is followed by a clause.‘As’ is followed by a noun, an adjective, or an adverb.
Used to introduce‘Because’ is used to introduce an explanation.‘As’ is used to introduce an example.

References

  1. Grammar, Grammars, and the Teaching of Grammar on JSTOR
  2. https://www.academypublication.com/issues/past/tpls/vol03/01/18.pdf