Judicial Custody vs Police Custody – Difference and Comparison

What is Judicial Custody?

In judicial custody, the arrested person is placed in the care of a jail or other detention facility. The person may be held until their court case is resolved, and at that point, either go free or be placed in criminal custody. They are detained while they await a ruling by the court and are not free to leave.  Judicial custody may last for days, weeks, or even months.

The purpose of bail is to ensure the defendant’s appearance at trial. There are two types of bail: cash bail and surety bail. Cash bail is when you pay the court the full amount of bail in cash. The court will hold onto the money until the case is over.

After a person is arrested, they will be transferred to the county jail where they will have to wait for a bail hearing. If they are not released on bail, they will be held in judicial custody until their trial.

Judicial custody is a form of detention that is used in criminal courts. It is a temporary measure that is used to ensure that a person shows up for their court case. The person may be held until their court case is resolved, and at that point, either go free or be placed in criminal custody. They are detained while they await a ruling by the court and are not free to leave.

What is Police Custody?

Police custody is a criminal justice system in which a person who has been arrested or is under investigation is held in custody by law enforcement officials. Police custody may be temporary (for example, while a criminal investigation is ongoing) or permanent. During police custody, the person may be subjected to questioning by law enforcement officials.

Police custody is the legal process in which a person who has been arrested or is under investigation is held in custody by law enforcement officials. Police custody may be temporary or permanent. During police custody, the person may be subjected to questioning by law enforcement officials.

Police custody is the period of time during which a suspect is held in police custody. This can be either before or after being charged with a crime. The custody may be brief, such as when the suspect is being held for questioning, or it may be more prolonged, such as when the suspect is awaiting trial. The conditions of police custody can vary depending on the country and the specific case.

In law, police custody is the situation in which a suspect is held by law enforcement officials. The suspect may be held for questioning or for a period of time after arrest. Police custody may be temporary or permanent. During police custody, the suspect may be subjected to questioning by law enforcement officials.

Difference Between Judicial Custody and Police Custody

The main difference between police custody and judicial custody is that in police custody, the person is held by the police while in judicial custody, the person is held by the court. Police custody is for a shorter period than judicial custody. Police custody is used when the police are investigating a crime and judicial custody is used when the person has been charged with a crime.

There is a fundamental difference between police custody and judicial custody. Police custody is when the police have a person in their custody, and they are investigating a crime. Judicial custody is when the person has been arrested and is awaiting trial. The police can hold a person in custody for a certain period, but after that, the person must be released or charged with a crime.

Comparison Between Judicial Custody and Police Custody

ComparisonJudicial CustodyPolice Custody  
Controloperates according to the court’s rules, and the judge or magistrate decides how to handle the casearresting a suspect or accuser while they are in police custody and placing them in their provisional confinement
InvestigationEvidence provided by interrogation reportsInvestigation done by the police
DurationAfter proven guilty, moved to Judicial custody from police custody. 2 hours to 15 days
JailKept in central jailsKept in police lockups

References

  1. https://www.proquest.com/openview/40750c1cdd16f081d97027077c2174cc/1?pq-origsite=gscholar&cbl=18750&diss=y
  2. https://www.taylorfrancis.com/books/mono/10.4324/9780203810316/police-custody-layla-skinns